Mathematics Institute for Learning Disabilities and Difficulties


People


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Diane Bryant

Dr. Diane Pedrotty Bryant is a professor of learning disabilities in the Department of Special Education at The University of Texas at Austin and director of the Mathematics Institute on Learning Disabilities and Difficulties at MCPER. Bryant holds the Mollie Villeret Davis Professorship in Learning Disabilities. She received her doctorate from the University of New Mexico in 1986. She has taught students with learning disabilities and has served as a special education teacher and an administrator in the Albuquerque, New Mexico, public schools. Currently, she is the principal investigator of an Institute of Education Sciences-funded Goal 2 grant (R324A120364) that focuses on the development and field testing of interventions for Tier 2 sixth- and seventh-grade students who have mathematics difficulties and receive instruction in math intervention classes (Project AIM). She served as the principal investigator for a multiyear Institute of Education Sciences-funded grant (Goal 2) that focused on the development and validation of early numeracy assessment and intervention materials in local schools and in a 2-year state-funded scale-up project for early numeracy progress-monitoring and intervention materials (English and Spanish). She also served as the principal investigator of the Middle School Teachers Algebra Readiness intervention grant, which involved lesson development and piloting in middle schools. She was the principal investigator for the 3-Tier Mathematics Project, including interventions and the Texas Early Mathematics Inventories, which were funded by the Texas Education Agency. Most recently, she has been involved in research studies focusing on early numeracy instruction with students with autism, word problem solving strategy intervention with students who have learning disabilities, middle school Tier 2 rational numbers interventions, and writing instruction for primary grades studies. She is the co-editor-in-chief of Learning Disability Quarterly, the author or co-author of textbooks and articles, and serves on the editorial boards of special education journals. For more information, read Bryant's full bio



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Brian R. Bryant

Dr. Brian R. Bryant serves as co-principal investigator for the Validation of Early Mathematics Interventions Project, which is funded by the Institute of Education Sciences, and project coordinator of the 3-Tier Mathematics Project, which is funded by the Texas Education Agency. Bryant's undergraduate degree in elementary education and graduate degree in special education are from the University of Southern Maine (formerly the University of Maine at Portland-Gorham), and he obtained his doctorate from The University of Texas at Austin. He taught special education in Maine public schools for 2 years in K–8 and 1 year at the high school level. He has served as a visiting professor or as an adjunct at UT Austin, Florida Atlantic University, the University of Louisville, Pacific Lutheran University, and the University of Hawaii. His research interests are in mathematics and reading learning disabilities, intellectual disabilities (particularly in the area of support systems), and assistive technology. He has published numerous tests, articles, books, and chapters in books. To contact Bryant, visit the UT Austin Department of Special Education website.


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David Chard

Dr. David Chard became Wheelock College's 14th president on July 1, 2016. He was previously dean of the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development at Southern Methodist University (SMU), where he created a strategic vision focused on undergraduate and graduate programs built on evidence-based practices. Chard also served as associate dean for the College of Education at the University of Oregon. He has held faculty appointments at both Boston University and The University of Texas at Austin and in the late 1990s served as associate director of the Texas Center for Reading and Language Arts at UT Austin. Chard earned a Ph.D. in special education at the University of Oregon in 1995 and a B.S. in mathematics and chemistry education from Central Michigan University in 1985. His scholarly focus has been on the role of instruction in the development of basic literacy and numeracy skills for students with learning disabilities or those at risk for school failure. He has co-directed a number of federally funded model demonstration projects and research studies, and he has directed or co-directed several state and regional grants and contracts that have examined the improvement of schools and student achievement through the development of teachers’ knowledge and practice. Chard has published several research articles; co-authored and contributed to multiple book chapters; and either written or co-written numerous technical reports, monographs, and training guides. A frequent presenter at national and international education conferences, he has taught courses on behavior management, special education reading and writing, learning disabilities, and special education law. To contact Chard, visit the Wheelock College website.


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Barbara J. Dougherty

Dr. Barbara Dougherty is a professor and the Richard G. Miller Endowed Chair of Mathematics Education in the College of Education at the University of Missouri. Dougherty's research areas include using measurement to develop mathematical concepts for grades 1–5 and prekindergarten number concepts; exploring strategies to support struggling learners in mathematics, including tiers 2 and 3 in the response to intervention process; and developing assessments that support the progress-monitoring system for learners in algebra. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Missouri in curriculum and instruction – mathematics education, an M.A. from Northeast Missouri State University in mathematics, and a B.S.E. from Northeast Missouri State University in special education. She has authored several books and chapters on mathematics acquisition and instruction and has won several awards for her work, including the Outstanding Research Award, School of Education, 2009; Outstanding Grant Writer Award, School of Education, 2006; Outstanding Faculty Researcher, Phi Delta Kappa, Ole Miss Chapter, 2006; and Best Paper Award for "Unpacking the Content to Find the Pedagogy," co-authored with Kerry Holmes, College Teaching Methods and Styles Conference and Journal, fall of 2005. She was nominated for the 2006 Frist Faculty/Staff Service Award, spring of 2006.


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Leanne Ketterlin Geller

Dr. Leanne Ketterlin Geller is an associate professor in education policy and leadership at Southern Methodist University. Geller's research focuses on the development and validation of formative assessment systems in mathematics that provide instructionally relevant information to support students with diverse needs. Her work centers on using technology to provide flexible assessment systems through the integration of accommodations and principles of universal design. She disseminates her research findings through publications and presentations in the areas of mathematics education, measurement and assessment, and special education. Her experience as a science teacher in public high schools and her training as a K–12 administrator inform her research. To contact Geller, visit the Southern Methodist University website.


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Jessica Hunt

A former middle school and elementary school mathematics teacher, Dr. Jessica Hunt is dedicated to the study of children’s thinking and learning in mathematics, especially children identified as having a learning disability. Hunt's current research focuses on the explication of elementary and middle school students' development of mathematics concepts through their mathematical activity. She has been awarded a National Science Foundation CAREER award to support her research. She received her Ph.D. in education in 2011 from the University of Central Florida in Orlando. 


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Karen Karp

Dr. Karen Karp is a visiting professor in the Johns Hopkins University School of Education. Previously, Karp was a professor of mathematics education in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Louisville. Formerly an elementary teacher, her research interests include teaching mathematics to students with disabilities, gender equity and mathematics education, and integrating mathematics and children’s literature. She has served on several boards and committees, such as the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Board of Directors (2008–2011), as the past president of the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators, and on the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education Board of Examiners. She has authored several articles and chapters, and the books Elementary and Middle School Mathematics: Teaching Developmentally (with Van de Walle and Bay Williams) and Feisty Females: Inspiring Girls to Think Mathematically (with Brown, Allen, and Allen). She has won several teaching awards, including the University of Louisville President’s Distinguished Teaching Award and the Helen Cunningham Educator Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Mathematics at the Post-Secondary Level. To contact Karp, visit the Johns Hopkins University website.


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Sarah Powell

Dr. Sarah R. Powell is the principal investigator of the Developing Connections Between Word Problems and Mathematical Equations to Promote Word-Problem Performance Among Students With Mathematics Difficulty Institute of Education Sciences Goal 3 efficacy study. Powell is also a recipient of a National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship and a Greater Texas Foundation Faculty Fellowship. For more information, read Powell's full bio.



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Marcia Barnes

Dr. Marcia Barnes is a principal investigator in the Mathematics Institute. For more information, read Barnes' full bio.


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Brian R. Bryant

Dr. Brian R. Bryant serves as co-principal investigator for the Validation of Early Mathematics Interventions Project, which is funded by the Institute of Education Sciences, and project coordinator of the 3-Tier Mathematics Project, which is funded by the Texas Education Agency. Bryant's undergraduate degree in elementary education and graduate degree in special education are from the University of Southern Maine (formerly the University of Maine at Portland-Gorham), and he obtained his doctorate from The University of Texas at Austin. He taught special education in Maine public schools for 2 years in K–8 and 1 year at the high school level. He has served as a visiting professor or as an adjunct at UT Austin, Florida Atlantic University, the University of Louisville, Pacific Lutheran University, and the University of Hawaii. His research interests are in mathematics and reading learning disabilities, intellectual disabilities (particularly in the area of support systems), and assistive technology. He has published numerous tests, articles, books, and chapters in books. To contact Bryant, visit the UT Austin Department of Special Education website.


Photo of Sarah Powell

Sarah Powell

Dr. Sarah R. Powell is the principal investigator of the Developing Connections Between Word Problems and Mathematical Equations to Promote Word-Problem Performance Among Students With Mathematics Difficulty Institute of Education Sciences Goal 3 efficacy study. Powell is also a recipient of a National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship and a Greater Texas Foundation Faculty Fellowship. For more information, read Powell's full bio.




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Sarah Benz


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Kate Berry

Dr. Katherine Berry recently received her doctorate in special education from The George Washington University with a focus on elementary-aged students with learning disabilities. Berry also holds a master of arts in teaching in special education from Trinity Washington University and a bachelor of arts in art history from the University of Virginia. She has served as a special education teacher and instructional coach for K–8 students with a range of disabilities in high-needs schools in the Washington, D.C., area. She also has worked on federally funded education grant projects, trained teachers and school leaders on strategies for supporting students with learning disabilities, and presented at numerous national conferences.


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Victoria Diez


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Marissa Filderman

Marissa Filderman is currently pursuing her Ph.D in special education at the University of Texas at Austin. Before starting the program, Filderman earned a B.A. in Sociology from the University of Maryland and a M.Ed in Curriculum and Instruction with a focus on Literacy at American University. Filderman taught Special Education at high needs elementary schools in Washington, DC and Pompano Beach, FL. She is particularly interested in research on reading interventions for students with and at risk for learning disabilities.


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Suzanne Forsyth


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Gabe Gafner


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Rene Grimes


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Jihyun Lee

Jihyun Lee is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in special education with a concertation in learning disabilities and behavioral disorders at the University of Texas at Austin. She attended Deagu University in South Korea, where she earned her B.A. in elementary special education as well as rehabilitation psychology. She taught students with disabilities in public elementary schools and a special education school for six and half years in South Korea as a special education teacher. While working as a special education teacher, she earned her M.Ed. in education administration from Korea National University of Education. After moving to the U.S., she earned her M.S. in special education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is currently interested in research on teaching mathematics to students with learning disabilities. She is working as a graduate research assistant in the project AIM2 at the Meadows Center for Preventing Educational Risk. In this project, she visits middle schools in Austin and San Antonio to provide professional development and mathematics intervention materials and to measure the fidelity of the intervention.


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Meijia Liu

Meijia Liu is currently pursuing her Ph.D in special education at the University of Texas at Austin. Before starting the program, Liu earned a M.Ed in Special Education with a focus on Early Childhood at University of Texas at Austin. She used to work at special education class rooms in Austin, TX, at pre-K and elementary level. She is particularly interested in research on mathematics interventions for students with and at risk for learning disabilities.


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Natalya Lynn


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Amanda Martinez-Lincoln

Amanda Martinez-Lincoln is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in special education with a concentration in learning disabilities and behavioral disorders at The University of Texas at Austin. She attended West Texas A&M University, where she earned her B.S. in psychology and was awarded a Kilgore grant to complete an independent undergraduate research project, Field Independence/Dependence Relationship With Intelligence. She stayed at the university to earn her M.A. in psychology and completed her thesis, Normative Differences in English-Speaking and Spanish-Speaking Individuals on the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test. From 2009 to 2015, she worked as a research scientist in the Biology Department at The University of Texas at San Antonio. She worked on a project that used event-related potentials to examine arithmetic processing in bilinguals and recently published an article in Neuroscience Letters investigating how experience in adulthood can change arithmetic memory networks established in childhood. She headed involvement in the Woodlawn Elementary Science Night, a program to get elementary students interested in science, and the Expand Your Horizons Conference, a yearly workshop to provide middle school girls with role models for careers in science.


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Soyoung Park

Soyoung Park is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Special Education at The University of Texas at Austin where she specializes in Learning Disabilities and Behavioral Disorders in the teaching of Mathematics. She is a Graduate Research Assistant at the MCPER where she participates in the Mathematics Institute for Learning Disabilities and Difficulties and, specifically, the AIM2 project. She received an M.A. in Special Education from Seoul National University in South Korea. While completing her M.A., she worked as a Graduate Student Instructor in the Department of Education for two and a half years. Her research interests include evidence-based intervention and assessment for students with learning disabilities and professional development for teachers working in secondary education.


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Dakota Schiel


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Alex Tran


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Andrea Wilson


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Brenda Zaparolli